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Article updated and revised to reflect recent research and demographic population changes

Updated on 01 Oct 2013. The previous version of this content can be found here.
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date: 27 April 2017

Abstract and Keywords

According to the 2010 Census, 308.7 million people resided in the United States on April 1, 2010, of which 50.5 million (or 16%) were of Hispanic or Latino origin. The Mexican-origin population increased by 54% since the previous Census, and it had the largest numeric increase (11.2 million), growing from 20.6 million in 2000 to 31.8 million in 2010 (Ennis, Rio-Vargas, & Albert, 2011). The current U.S. Census demographic information was used to project the social needs of Mexican-origin Hispanics. An estimated 11.2 million unauthorized Hispanic-origin migrants reside in the United States. Select provisions of the failed 2007 Immigration Reform Act are discussed in context of the Reagan Administration’s 1986 Immigration Reform Act. Key words are defined to facilitate understanding of issues presented that affect the well-being of the Mexican-origin population. Best social work practices for working with Mexican-origin Hispanics are proposed in the context of issues identified in the narrative. Future trends are speculative predictions with suggestions based on the author's social work practice experience, research, and knowledge of the literature.

Keywords: 2010 American Community Survey, amnesty, authorized, bilingual, case aide model, Chicano(a), documented, empowerment perspective, English as a Second Language, English only movement, Hispanic or Latino(a), HIV and AIDS, Immigration Reform Act, indigenous case aides, Limited English Proficient, Mexican American, Mexican origin, monolingual, National Council of La Raza, No Child Left Behind Act, other Spanish, promotora model, social justice, strengths perspective principles, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, unauthorized, undocumented

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