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Editorial Board

The editorial board behind Encyclopedia of Social Work represents today's top experts in social work education, policy, and practice. With experience both in academia and as clinical practitioners, the thirteen-member board and the Editor in Chief review incoming articles monthly, drawing on knowledge gained over decades of work and study. Their specialties are numerous and varied, in an effort to ensure that the Encyclopedia's overview articles reflect the breadth of social work itself. Prior members of the board can be found here.

Editor in Chief: Cynthia Franklin, Ph.D, LCSW

Cynthia Franklin, Ph.D, is Professor and holder of the Stiernberg/Spencer Family Professorship in Mental Health at The University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work. An internationally known scholar and leader in school mental health practice, she has over 100 publications on topics such as aiding youth at risk of dropping out, solution-focused brief therapy, and helping parenting youths stay in school. She is the author of several books including The School Services Sourcebook: A Guide for School-based Professionals and Family Treatment: Evidence-based Practice with Populations At-Risk. Her numerous awards include a lifetime achievement award from the Solution-focused, Brief Therapy Association. Dr. Franklin is a clinical member of The American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy and holds licenses in clinical social work and marriage & family therapy. Before going into academia full time Dr. Franklin conducted a clinical practice for 10 years.

 

Editorial Board

Paula Allen-Meares, Ph.D., MSW, is the John Corbally Presidential Professor and Professor of Medicine in the College of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She is Chancellor Emerita at UIC and Vice President of the University of Illinois. She also holds faculty appointments at both UIC and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Allen-Meares is Dean and Professor Emerita and the Norma Radin Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the Royal Society of Medicine, and past Trustee of the New York Academy of Medicine. She serves on a number of editorial boards and has over 170 articles, chapters, books, and commentaries. Her scholarly works have been translated in other languages and studied around the world. Dr. Allen-Meares’s research interests include education, mental and health equity issues of minority youth and their families, school social work, community capacity building to support positive development of children/youth, violence in schools/community, and the growing interest in STEM education for at-risk students.

 

 

Dr. Tricia B. Bent-Goodley is Professor of Social Work at Howard University. Dr. Bent-Goodley's research and writing has focused on developing community and faith-based interventions in the areas of domestic violence, dating violence, HIV prevention, and healthy relationship education. She is a member of the NASW Committee on Women's Issues, CSWE Council on Leadership Development, Co-Chair of the NABSW Academy for African-Centered Social Work, Board Member of Community Education Group, Steering Committee Member of the Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community, and Resource Member for the International Program Committee of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. As a mental health practitioner and consultant, Dr. Bent-Goodley worked with youth in juvenile settings.

 

 

Alan J. Detlaff is Dean and the inaugural Maconda Brown O’Connor Endowed Dean’s Chair of the Graduate College of Social Work at the University of Houston. Prior to joining the University of Houston, Dean Dettlaff served on the faculty of the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He received his bachelor’s degree in social work from TCU, and master’s in social work and PhD from the University of Texas at Arlington. Dean Dettlaff’s research focuses on improving outcomes for children and youth in the child welfare system through examining and addressing the factors contributing to racial disparities. His research and consultation with state child welfare systems has led to significant policy and practice improvements that have resulted in reductions in the overrepresentation of African American children in these systems. Dean Dettlaff has also conducted groundbreaking research to identify and understand the unique needs of immigrant Latino children and families involved in child welfare. Dean Dettlaff is co-editor of Addressing Racial Disproportionality and Disparities in Human Services: Multisystemic Approaches and Immigrant and Refugee Children and Families: Culturally Responsive Practice, published by Columbia University Press.

 

 

 

Sarah Gehlert, Ph.D., is the E. Desmond Lee Professor of Racial and Ethnic Diversity at the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis, and Professor in the Department of Surgery of the School of Medicine. She is the Co-Program Leader of the Prevention and Control Program of the Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center and Co-Director of the Transdisciplinary Center on Energetics and Cancer (TREC). Dr. Gehlert serves as Senior Advisor of the Center for Community-Engaged Research of the Institutes of Clinical and Translational Sciences. Dr. Gehlert was a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Human Genome Research Institute at NIH until January 2016. She is a member of the Council for Extramural Grants at the American Cancer Society and of the Steering Committee of the California Breast Cancer Research Program. She is an inaugural Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW) and the Society for Social Work and Research, and a fellow of the Academy of Transdisciplinary Learning and Advanced Studies. She is President of AASWSW and Past President of the Society for Social Work and Research and serves on the editorial boards of Health & Social Work, Social Work Research, and Social Service Review, and as a Managing Editor of the Transdisciplinary Journal of Science and Engineering.

 

 

 

Lynne M. Healy, MSW, Ph.D is Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor at the University of Connecticut School of Social Work, where she teaches non-profit management, international social work, and social policy. Her areas of expertise and publication include human rights, internationalizing social work curriculum, international social work, human service agency management, and ethics. She has recently been named the Main Representative to the United Nations in New York for the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) and serves on editorial boards of 6 professional journals. In July 2014, she received IASSW’s Katherine Kendall award for contributions to international social work education.

 

 

Barbara L. Jones, Ph.D., is UT Regents and Distinguished Teaching Professor and Associate Dean for Health Affairs at the UT Austin School of Social Work. She is Co-Director of the Institute for Collaborative Health Research and Practice. Dr. Jones is a Distinguished Scholar and Fellow of the National Academies of Practice and Vice-Chair of the Social Work Academy. Dr. Jones is the 2014 recipient of the American Psychosocial Oncology Society (APOS) Outstanding Training and Education Award. She is the past president of the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers (APOSW) and recipient of the 2013 APOSW Social Worker of the Year Award. Dr. Jones was co-investigator on ExCEL in Social Work, an NCI-funded project to train oncology social workers. She is a Steering Committee member of the Pediatric Palliative Care Research Network, a Project on Death in America Social Work Scholar, and recipient of the PDIA Social Work Leadership Award. Dr. Jones is Associate Editor of the Journal of Psychosocial Oncology and on the editorial board of the Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology. Her clinical experience is in pediatric and AYA oncology, pediatric palliative care, and grief and loss. Dr. Jones conducts research on palliative care, mindfulness-based interventions, adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors, and interprofessional education. Dr. Jones has been a leader in developing the interprofessional education curriculum for the new Dell Medical School.

 

 

Johnny S. Kim Ph.D., LICSW, is an Associate Professor at the University of Denver Graduate School of Social Work. Dr. Kim received his Master’s degree in social work from Boston College, Ph.D. in social work from the University of Texas at Austin, and was a Council on Social Work Education Minority Clinical Fellow. Prior to his doctoral studies, Dr. Kim worked as a school social worker and case manager for community based mental health agencies in Seattle. Professional interests include: school social work practice, solution-focused brief therapy, meta-analysis, Asian American youth development, and evidence-based practice.

 

 

James J. Kelly is the President of Menlo College located in the Silicon Valley in Atherton, California. He is Immediate Past President of the National Association of Social Workers, and served for many years as an interim provost, associate vice president, dean, director, and professor in the California State University system. His areas of expertise include gerontology, ethics, social justice, social work education, technology in education, higher education administration, and ageism. Dr. Kelly is a Past President of the California Institute of Mental Health and a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America. He is the 2013 recipient of the Frances Lomas Feldman Excellence in Education Award from the USC School of Social Work.

 

 

Michael S. Kelly PhD LCSW is Associate Professor and MSW Program Director at Loyola University Chicago School of Social Work. He has written three books for Oxford, the most recent being School Social Work: An Evidence-Informed Framework for Practice. Before coming to Loyola, he worked in the Chicago area as a school social worker, family therapist, and youth minister for 14 years. His major areas of interest focus on: models of school social work practice, evidence-based practice (EBP) in schools, religion and spirituality as a variable in understanding student outcomes.

 

 

Sadye L. M. Logan, DSW is Professor and Director of the Isaiah DeQuincey Newman Institute for Peace and Social Justice in the College of Social Work at the University of South Carolina. Prior to joining the University of South Carolina faculty in 1999, she was a member of the University of Kansas faculty where she also served as Associate Director of the African and African American Studies Department and co-director of the Center for the Studies of African American Families. Her teaching and research interest focus on advancing culturally responsive theories and practice for effective social work with women, children, and families.

 

 

Terry Mizrahi, MSW, PhD is a professor at the Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College; chair of Community Organizing, Planning & Development. She also teaches as guest faculty at Sarah Lawrence College in the Health Advocacy Program. Her expertise lies in medical sociology, organizational and community development, health-care policy and patients’ rights; areas of research and training in professional socialization and physician behavior, social work in health care, interdisciplinary collaboration, interorganizational coalition-building and community organizing. She served as president of the National Association of Social Workers and was a founder of the Association for Community Organization and Social Administration. She co-edited the Encyclopedia of Social Work 20th Edition print reference, published in 2008.

 

 

Shanta Pandey, PhD, is Professor at Boston College School of Social Work. She is interested in immigrant health, women’s empowerment, gender equity, maternal and child health, and poverty polices that affect poor women and children in the United States and developing regions of South Asia. In the United States, she has advocated in favor of the policies and programs that empower young mothers by providing them with opportunities for education, especially 4-year college education. Outside of the United States, Pandey has focused on policies and programs aimed at improving the status of women in South Asia (Nepal, India, and Bangladesh). She relies on both field studies and national surveys to assess women’s status in terms of their education and maternal and child health. Her research has been funded by grants from the Department of Health and Human Services, US Department of Agriculture, and the MacArthur Foundation. Prior to joining Boston College, she served as a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis for 25 years.

 

 

Dr. Frederic Reamer is professor in the graduate program of the School of Social Work, Rhode Island College. His research and teaching have addressed a wide range of human service issues, including mental health, health care, criminal justice, public welfare, and professional ethics. Reamer received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and has served as a social worker in correctional and mental health settings. Since 1992 he has served on the Rhode Island Parole Board. Reamer is the author of many books and articles on the subjects of professional ethics and other topics.

 

 

Founding Editorial Board

 

Dr. Elizabeth Clark served as the Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of Social Workers. Located in Washington, DC, the NASW is the largest membership organization of professional social workers in the country with nearly 145,000 members. In addition to promoting, developing, and protecting the practice of social work and social workers, NASW has a strong social justice and advocacy mission. Dr. Clark’s background is in health care with a specialization in oncology, hope, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Dr. Clark holds master’s degrees in social work and public health and a doctorate in medical sociology. She is also the recipient of an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa.

 

 

Larry E. Davis, MA, MSW, Ph.D. is the Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh, where he is the Donald M. Henderson Professor. Dr. Davis is the Director and founder of the Center on Race and Social Problems. He is also founder of the journal, Race and Social Problems. His professional interests include interracial group dynamics, the impact of race, gender, and class on interpersonal interactions, youth, African American family formation; academic achievement and youth decisions to stay in school. Dr. Davis has collaborated on several partnerships with local policymakers to confront issues such as increasing diversity and lowering racial disparities.

 

 

Dr. Rowena Fong is the Ruby Lee Piester Centennial Professor in Services to Children and Families in the School of Social Work at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Fong’s research areas and professional interests focus on adoptions and child welfare, international adoptions from China, Chinese American children and families, women and children victims of human trafficking, and more. She received the 2008 Distinguished Recent Contributions in Social Work Education Award from the Council on Social Work Education, the 2007 Texas Exes Teaching Award from the University of Texas at Austin, the 2001 Regent's Teaching Award from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, and the 2001 Social Worker of the Year in Education and Training from the National Association of Social Work, Honolulu Chapter.

 

 

Alberto Godenzi, MBA, PhD is Dean and Professor at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work. He specializes in interpersonal violence, gender and organization, and global partnerships; published dozens of scholarly articles and several books; secured research grants from private and public funding institutions in Europe and the US. He was Professor and Director at the Department of Social Work and Social Policy at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland; Member of the Board of Directors of the Council on Social Work Education; Secretary General of the International Consortium for Social Development; and President of the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work.

 

 

Darrell P. Wheeler, Ph.D., M.P.H, ACSW is dean of the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago. His research and publications focus on the identification and exploration of individual and communal resiliency in HIV prevention and intervention, with particular emphasis on African American and Black gay, bisexual and transgender communities. He has worked as a clinical social worker and psychotherapist and previously served as Associate Dean for Research and Community Partnerships at the Hunter College School of Social Work.

 

 

 

Dr. Joan Levy Zlotnik, PhD, ACSW, serves as the director of the National Association of Social Worker’s think tank, the Social Work Policy Institute (SWPI). She has studied the history and policy impacting the use of Title IV-E funds in social work education and has taught child welfare practice and child welfare policy. She currently serves on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Child Maltreatment Research, Policy and Practice for the Next Decade, the Dual Eligible Beneficiaries’ Workgroup of the National Quality Forum’s Measure Application Partnership, the CDC Knowledge to Action Think Tank on Child Maltreatment Prevention, and the National Advisory Committee for the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute.